19 Unusual Orchids
Wed, Jul 21, 2021

19 Orchids That Look like Other Things or the Most Unusual Orchids in the World

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Orchids are quite traditional flowers for any home, both outside and inside. They are one of the largest plant families on the planet, with about 30,000 species. With such a variety, it is no wonder that there are also unusual varieties of orchids that are not so common.

19 Orchids That Look like Other Things

Monkey Face Orchid (Dracula Simia Orchid)

Monkey Face Orchid (Dracula Simia Orchid)

Dracula Simia or “monkey face orchid” is native to the forests of Southeastern Ecuador and Peru. Found in tropical rainforests between 1000 and 2000 meters above sea level, their flowers with “monkey faces” on them are created by the petals and stamens of a plant. This type of flower was named by botanist Carlyle A. Luer in 1978, and although they look like monkeys, they certainly don’t smell like them. In fact,this “animal orchid” emits a pleasant citrus scent. In their natural habitat, orchids “with monkey faces” can bloom at any time of the year. They prefer 70% -100% humidity.

They can grow up to two feet tall, and if you ever try to grow them at home, experts recommend planting them in sphagnum moss instead of soil.

Flying Duck (Caleana Major)

Flying Duck (Caleana Major)

This is an Australian weird orchid with a bright, rich color, like an exact copy of a figurine of a small flying duck, with a well-defined beak. This amazing flower was discovered in the century before last on the territory of the tidal island Bennelong Point, which is now the symbol of the Australian capital – the Sydney Opera House.

Holy Spirit Orchid Hoax (White Egret)

Holy Spirit Orchid Hoax (White Egret)

The orchid of the genus Habenaria Radiata (White Egret) belongs to terrestrial deciduous plants that completely shed greens and stems during dormancy. Japan is considered its homeland, where the plant has been cultivated for many years. This plant can often be found in Japanese courtyards. The orchid “White Egret” is distinguished from other representatives of the genus by its extraordinary colors. It also has a shape that resembles a flying dove.

Bee Orchid (Ophrys Apifera)

Bee Orchid (Ophrys Apifera)

The botanical name for this unique orchid is Ophrys apifera, but it is also often called Ophrys insectifera. These flowers are visually similar to female bees and give off a scent, which attracts male bees. They are most common in the Mediterranean region, but can also be found in Scotland, Northern Ireland, and the UK. An incredibly cute plant that would make a great addition to your garden.

Ballerina Orchid (Caladenia Melanema)

Ballerina Orchid (Caladenia Melanema)

It grows in a limited area of ​​southwestern Australia. An orchid grows on sandy soil near lakes with salt water. The plant is rare and not numerous and has 1-2 light creamy yellow flowers with elements of red ornament. This pretty orchid is small, it grows up to 15 cm in height. The size of the bud is 4-5 cm, the shape is similar to a dancing doll. The rare orchid flowers can only be observed for 2 weeks.

Dove Orchid (Peristeria Elata)

Dove Orchid (Peristeria Elata)

Its botanical name is Peristeria elata, also called the flower of the Holy Spirit orchid Snopes. This orchid that looks like a dove belongs to the large varieties growing in the highlands of South America. Gives preference to cool and shady places. The leaves are pointed, the petals are white, shaped like a baby or little dove wrapped in diapers. The flowering period is in the summer when the flowers have a pleasant scent.

Orchids Dancing Girls (Impatiens Bequaertii)

Orchids Dancing girls (Impatiens Bequaertii)

A very rare plant that many orchid lovers call collectible. Its petals are white and sometimes soft pink in the shape of a little girl in a skirt who dances. It can hardly tolerate inappropriate conditions of detention. But the hybrids of this orchid that look like people are relatively unpretentious. It grows about a foot tall and blooms all year round.

Fly Orchid (Ophrys Insectifera)

Fly Orchid (Ophrys Insectifera)

This amazing orchid is native to Europe and favors places with alkaline soil. The plant got its name because its inflorescence resembles a fly. This flower uses a special scent to attract hornets and bumblebees. This amazing orchid blooms in June when properly cared for.

Monkey Orchid (Orchis Simia or Orchis Italica)

Monkey Orchid (Orchis simia or Orchis Italica)

The botanical inscription for this orchid is Orchis simia or Orchis Italica. This is another orchid that outwardly resembles the bodies of small monkeys or men that hang from its flowers. Flowers are often white, gray, red, purple, or pink. This amazing orchid was first discovered in 1779 in France. It is a perennial plant that blooms every year from May to June.

Bumblebee Orchid (Ophrys Bombyliflora)

Bumblebee Orchid (Ophrys bombyliflora)

It is a perennial orchid that resembles a bumblebee. Petals are short, triangular, obtuse, greenish-yellow and brown at the base. Small flowers (up to 4 cm) grow in inflorescence on the stem. Grows well in subtropical, Mediterranean, or temperate climates. In captivity, the plant requires special attention.

Moth Orchid (Phalaenopsis)

Moth Orchid (Phalaenopsis)

At a distance, a couple of buds look like flying moth butterflies, but if you get even closer you can see a bird’s head. The moth orchid is also a collection of artificially bred hybrids that emerged from 60 species, or even more. The flower grows in Southeast Asia, the Philippines, and northern Australia. Several phalaenopsis species in Malaysia can only bloom under certain climatic conditions.

Phalaenopsis is one of the most common genus of orchids. Since there is a large selection of hybrids, it is quite easy to grow them at home, but the plant requires a transplant, a lit place, fertilization, and frequent watering. Mature plants with a strong root system can bloom all year round, while young ones only a couple of months.

Goat Orchid (Ophrys Reinholdii)

Goat Orchid (Ophrys Reinholdii)

Its scientific name is Ophrys Reinholdii, but it is also often called Reinhold’s Bee Orchid. You can find it in Greece, Turkey, Iran, Iraq, and the Southwest Balkans. Many people say that this flower looks like a horned goat, but this orchid also resembles a purple alien giraffe.

Donkey orchid (Diuris)

Donkey orchid (Diuris)

The biological name for this plant is Diuris. It got its name due to its unusual appearance, which resembles the ears of a donkey. This impression appears due to the two side petals that protrude from the top of the flower.

Green Squid Orchid (Prosthechea Cochleata)

Green Squid Orchid (Prosthechea Cochleata)

Its botanical name is Prosthechea Cochleata, but the name shell orchid is also common. Found in Central America, the Caribbean, and Florida. With a purple cap and airy green shoots, these tiny buds resemble small octopuses that live in the sea. These strange orchids also resemble aliens.

The Bird Head Orchid (Phalaenopsis Sp.)

The Bird Head Orchid (Phalaenopsis sp.)

Its botanical designation is Phalaenopsis sp., but the name Pink Moth Orchid is also common.

These orchids that look like birds are native to Greece, Turkey, Iraq, and Iran. Most of these orchids look a little like flying butterflies, but there is something about this mesmerizing bud that resembles an elusive creature guarding the flower of nectar. It is cute, but a little scary.

Naked Man (Orchis Italica)

Naked Man (Orchis Italica)

This orchid that looks like a man gets its name from the shape of the labellum of each flower, which in general resembles the shape of a naked man. It grows up to 50 cm in height and blooms in bright pink, tightly clustered flowers. Most common in the Mediterranean.

Ghost Leafless Orchid (Dendrophylax Lindenii)

Ghost Leafless Orchid (Dendrophylax Lindenii)

Perennial, leafless epiphyte from the orchid family. Grows in Florida, Cuba, and the Bahamas. The plant consists of cobwebs of photosynthetic roots that are placed on the stem of the plant. It blooms from June to August, producing one to ten fragrant flowers that open in turn. The flowers are white, 3-4 cm wide, and 7-9 cm long. They have a strong, fruity, apple-like aroma. These strange-looking orchids have two long lateral “antennae” that curl slightly downward, resembling the hind legs of a jumping frog. The roots of this orchid are so well camouflaged on the steam that the flower seems to be floating in the air. Hence, the name “ghost orchid”.

Hot lips (Psychotria Elata)

Hot lips (Psychotria Elata)

It is a cool tropical orchid that occurs in the forests of Central and South America. Based on this, you can maintain and manage it yourself in your garden! Because the climate is quite suitable. The flower of Psychotria Elata looks like bright red lips, but only for a short time until it’s fully opened. But even with a full opening, this flower will be the pearl of your garden, decorating it with the unrivaled charm of a tropical flower.

Dragon’s Mouth Orchid (Arethusa Bulbosa)

Dragon’s Mouth Orchid (Arethusa Bulbosa)

Dragon’s Mouth orchid is a very rare flower that can be found in the marshlands of the eastern United States, North America, and eastern Canada. It is a beautiful, leafless orchid that grows up to 15 cm and forms large pink-purple flowers with white and yellow spots.

As you can see, nature has awarded orchids with many unusual characteristics. In addition to their original beauty, these plants are admired for their spectacular, intricate shapes and enchanting aroma.

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